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Happy 100th birthday, Turing!

& thank you for thinking such cool things & sharing them!




















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Reader Comments (2)

The most tragic irony — or, perhaps, greatest frontier for redemption — is that today, we’re still debating the very civil liberty and basic human right the violation of which precipitated Turing’s suicide, but we’re waging our wars, fueling and following that debate, largely via the machine he invented. More than half a century later, how many Turings are we forcing to be smaller than they are, and how many are we losing completely?

Sabrina, for more material to fuel your ruminations on this irony, read George Dyson's truly wonderful Turing's Cathedral

June 26, 2012 | Unregistered Commenterdmk38

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