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Sunday
Apr282013

Look, everybody: more Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS)!

Below a very welcome announcement from Jeremy Freese and Jamie Druckman -- & forwarded to me by Kevin Levay -- on the continued funding of TESS, which administers accepted study designs free of charge to a stratified on-line sample.

Actually, I'm going to do a post soon -- very soon! -- on use of on-line samples (& in particular on growing use of Mechanical Turk). Suffice it to say that if you can get a study conducted by TESS, you've got yourself an A1 sample -- for free!!

We are pleased to announce that Time-Sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences (TESS) was renewed for another round of funding by NSF starting last Fall. TESS allows researchers to submit proposals for experiments to be conducted on a nationally-representative, probability-based Internet platform, and successful proposals are fielded at no cost to investigators.  More information about how TESS works and how to submit proposals is available at http://www.tessexperiments.org. 

Additionally, we are pleased to announce the development of two new proposal mechanisms. TESS’s Short Studies Program (SSP) is accepting proposals for fielding very brief population-based survey experiments on a general population of at least 2000 adults. SSP recruits participants from within the U.S. using the same Internet-based platform as other TESS studies. More information about SSP and proposal requirements is available at http://www.tessexperiments.org/ssp.html. 

TESS’s Special Competition for Young Investigators is accepting proposals from June 15th-September 15th. The competition is meant to enable younger scholars to field large-scale studies and is limited to graduate students and individuals who are no more than 3 years post-Ph.D. More information about the Special Competition and proposal requirements is available at http://www.tessexperiments.org/yic.html. 

For the current grant, the principal investigators of TESS are Jeremy Freese and James Druckman of Northwestern University, who are assisted by a new team of over 65 Associate PIs and peer reviewers across the social sciences. More information about our APIs is available at http://www.tessexperiments.org/associatepi.html.

James Druckman and Jeremy Freese

Principal Investigators, TESS

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