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Thursday
Feb182016

America's two "climate changes"

From something I'm working on.  Anyone of the 14 billion regular readers of this blog could fill in the rest. But if you are one of 1.3 billion people who on any given day visit this site for the first time, there's more on the "'Two climate changes' thesis" here & here, among other places. . . .

America’s two “climate changes”

There are two climate changes in America: the one people “believe” or “disbelieve” in in order to express their cultural identities; and the one people ("believers" & "disbelievers" alike) acquire and use  scientific knowledge about  in order to make decisions of consequence, individual and collective.  I will present various forms of empirical evidence—including standardized science literacy tests, lab experiments, and real-world field studies in Southeast Florida—to support the “two climate changes” thesis.  I will also examine what this position implies about the forms of deliberative engagement necessary to rid the science communication environment of the toxic effects of the first climate change and to make it habitable for enlightened democratic engagement with the second.

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