"Kentucky farmer" spotted in Montana
Thursday, January 11, 2018 at 9:27AM
Dan Kahan

This site's 14 billion regular subscribers know the Kentucky Farmer as one of the types of people whose habits of mind feature cognitive dualism--the tendency to adopt one set of action-enabling beliefs in one setting and another, opposing set of action-enabling beliefs in another. For Kentucky Farmer, this style of reasoning helps him to maintain his membership in a cultural group for whom climate-change skepticism is identity-defining while also using scientific information on climate change to be a good farmer.

Well, he was cited recently, not in Kentucky but in Montana.  The reporter for a story on the detrimental impact of climate change on barley farming is the one who spotted him:

In the field, looking at his withering crop, Somerfeld was unequivocal about the cause of his damaged crop – “climate change.” But back at the bar, with his friends, his language changed. He dropped those taboo words in favor of “erratic weather” and “drier, hotter summers” – a not-uncommon conversational tactic in farm country these days.

Great #scicomm by Ari LeVaux, the reporter.

But of course this form of information processing remains tinged with mystery.

Article originally appeared on cultural cognition project (http://www.culturalcognition.net/).
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